About Heber-Overgaard

Heber-Overgaard is a census-designated place (CDP) in Navajo CountyArizonaUnited States. Situated atop the Mogollon Rim, the community lies at an elevation of 6,627 feet (2,020 m). The population was 2,822 at the 2010 census. Heber and Overgaard are technically two unincorporated communities, but as of the 1990 census, their close proximity has led to the merged name of “Heber-Overgaard”.

Heber was settled in 1883, by members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church), and the town is named after either Heber J. Grant or Heber C. Kimball, both prominent members of the LDS church. Overgaard, adjoining Heber, was settled c 1936 and was named after the owner of the first sawmill, Niels Kristian Overgaard.

Heber-Overgaard’s early economy was founded on dry farming and ranching while tourismretirement and timbering are the basis for present day industry.

Today, Heber-Overgaard has evolved into a retirement and tourism destination. Recreational and lifestyle activities such as hiking and fishing can be enjoyed in the summer, and cross country skiing in the winter. With a four-seasons climate, the town is a haven for those wishing to escape the heat of Phoenix. Land ownership in the Heber-Overgaard area is private, but surrounded by federally owned lands. As of 2010, nearly 66% of the houses are second homes. While the full-time resident population is 2,822, summertime population numbers climb to nearly 12,000.

In 1891 John Hoyle, Johann Frederick Heil, an immigrant from Baden, Germany and former cook for the Hashknife Outfit, opened the first Heber store. He was called “Hoyle” rather than “Heil” because some cowboys had trouble pronouncing his name. In addition to his store he had a farm located down Buckskin Wash. John Hoyle had relocated to Heber from the failed Wilford, Arizona settlement, 7 miles south of Heber, where he had a store and ranch. Samuel Porter helped him on his farm, and hauled freight to and from Holbrook. He ran the store until his death on August 2, 1912 of paralysis (possibly polio). He had no heirs to claim the land in the US. Through a German consulate, twenty-eight distant heirs were located and $3,046 was divided among them.